Archive | November, 2013

DIY Whipped Body Butter

20 Nov

This body butter is devine, it looks & smells good enough to eat & is so simple  to make!!

body-whip

All wrapped up in pretty jars it will make the most gorgeous Christmas Gifts.

whipped-body-butter-again

Rather than purchasing gifts for our loved ones this year Miss Two & I have decided to hand make treats for all our friends & family, so there will be a few jars of this under our tree.

The great thing about this recipe is that you can customise it to suit the ingredients you have & the people you are making it for. Make it with just cocoa butter & peppermint essential oil for a Mocha whip, make it with just shea butter & lavender for families with young children.

I used the combination of shea & cocoa butter because I love the smell & moisturising properties of the cocoa butter & the soothing, healing properties of the shea butter. You can substitute the apricot oil for what ever you have on hand, I used apricot oil because the butters & coconut oil are quite heavy & create a layer on the skin while apricot oil soaks in making the butter a little less greasy.

But be warned this is decadent stuff, it is light & fluffy but very moisturising, its great for dry heels, knees & sand papery elbows!! Great for a post shaving, waxing cream – possibly not so good as a face moisturiser!!

So get in your kitchen & have some fun!!

Whipped Body Butter a’la Mama Going Natural

  • 1/2 c coconut oil
  • 1/2 c cocoa butter
  • 1/2 c shea butter
  • 1/2 c apricot kernel oil
  • 1 t Vitamin E oil
  • 10 – 15 drops essential oils (I used 10 drops Rose Geranium oil, 3 drops Sweet Orange oil, 2 drops Neroli oil

Place coconut oil, shea butter & cocoa butter into a double boiler to melt (I just use a mason jar in a saucepan of boiling water).

Once the butters are melted, take your double boiler (or jar) off the heat & let it cool to room temperature & add in the apricot kernel oil, Vitamin E oil & essential oils. Stir in well & then place to set a little in the fridge for an hour, let it set but not till its hard like a lotion bar.

Then its time to whip it!! Either using a cake mixer or stick blender (I used the whisk attachment on my stick blender & it worked a treat). Whip it for 5 or so minutes until you make what looks like yummy whipped cream that smells good enough to eat.

Pour it into pretty containers & ENJOY

whipped-butter-cream

BEWARE your whip does not like heat, it should keep well in most bathroom cupboards but if its left in the sun – it will melt & loose its whipped texture!! If this happens refridgerate it till firm & re-whip it & it will be as good as new.

Mama-going-natural-signature

Granola Parfaits – healthy Gluten free snacks & desserts

13 Nov

granola-cups

This breakfast treat, go to snack, dessert & all around versatile Parfait recipe is fast becoming my daughters favourite.

Just between you & me she asks for “Cafe” – but I know that she really isn’t trying to escape my food, but that she really wants me to make her a Parfait.

These started out as an instant, easy snack for my daughter (that wasn’t all fruit!), but after polishing off her leftovers I now make two, one for her & one for me!

I am loving on these big time!! because they are super easy & quick, you can keep a giant mason jar of granola in your cupboard & then layer it with what ever fruit, yogurt or kefir you have on hand to make yummy, nutritious instant meals. They even store great in a little mason jar for taking to school & on outings. They can be made the night before & left in the fridge, the granola will of course soften a little – but its nice kind of gooey!

You can tailor make the recipe to your own specific requirements, layer it with soy or coconut yoghurt for a vegan variation, add in more nuts & seeds, add some chia seeds for a dose of super food……..the options are endless.

But most of all have fun creating pretty layers of yumminess in your jars.

Granola Parfaits a’la Mama Going Natural

Granola

  • 1 c oats
  • 1/4 c sultanas
  • 1/4 c cashews
  • 1/2 c quinoa flakes
  • 1/2 c puffed millet
  • 1/4 c desiccated coconut
  • 4 T honey

Combine all ingredients in a bowl, stir honey through well to coat dry ingredients. Place in thin layers on baking trays into a moderate oven (approx 150 degrees). Watch your granola while it toasts & stir occasionally (this will only take 5 minutes or so). Once all of your granola is golden & toasted remove from the oven. Once cool place in mason jars to be used at a later time.

I love this Granola recipe big time, because you can also turn it into instant Muesli Bars, simply caramelise butter & honey in a saucepan over high heat till soft ball stage (when cooled in water a drop of the mixture should make a ball). Pour your caramelised honey into your granola, stir well & press into pans & refrigerate to set.

How to Make Granola Parfaits

  • Batch of yoghurt (recipe can be found here)
  • Fruit – we use frozen blueberries & banana’s – but only because that is Miss Two’s favourites!
  • Granola
  • Mason Jars, glasses or bowls

Spoon 1 & a 1/2 tablespoons of fruit into the bottom of your jar then add a tablespoon of yoghurt & top with a tablespoon of granola, keep layering until your jar is full, topping with a little sprinkle of granola for that yummy crunch factor!

granola-cup-2

Then Enjoy 🙂

Mama-going-natural-signature

Titanium Dioxide why we don’t touch it

7 Nov

All of our Mama Going Natural products are formulated without any Titanium Dioxide. Even though it is in nearly all foundations & cosmetics you buy.

Why?, because not only is Titanium Dioxide known to damage cells & speed up the ageing process of our skin, it is now being investigated as a potential carcinogen. 

It has long been known that Titanium Dioxide is not photo stable, when it is exposed to light on your skin it creates free radicals that in-turn attack your skin cells causing premature ageing. As if that isn’t bad enough, now it is being linked to cancer.

Have a look in your bathroom cupboard, not only are you eating Titanium Dioxide on a daily basis but you are also smothering your largest breathing organ (your skin) with it every single day. Nearly all cosmetics (even supposedly natural ones) contain large amounts of Titanium Dioxide, you will find it in your powders, foundations, lipsticks, eyeshadows, blushes & even in your sunscreen (although it may not be listed in the ingredients – legally they don’t have to list everything, only “active” ingredients).

Not a nice thought when it has been proven that substances applied to the skin show up in the blood stream within half an hour.

So go through your bathroom cupboards & ditch the Titanium Dioxide today, not only will you prevent premature ageing of your skin, but you might just save your life.

Check out our Titanium Dioxide FREE BB creammakeup & Sunscreens for the whole family.

titanium-dioxide

7th October 2013

By Sayer Ji

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

The U.S. food industry is notorious for poisoning the very consumers who drive their multi-billion dollar enterprise, even spending millions against their right to informed consent (truthful GMO labeling). So, is it any wonder that this deregulated and increasingly deranged juggernaut is experimenting on its own customer base by exposing them to trillions of toxic nanoparticles?

A new study published in Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy titled, “Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gastric epithelial cells in vitro,” reveals for the first time that the nanoparticle form of the common “whitening” agent known as titanium dioxide is capable of inducing “tumor-like” changes in exposed human cells.[1]

Whereas previous cell research has established that titanium dioxide (TiO2) is cytotoxic (cell damaging),[2] this is the first study of its kind to find exposed cells undergo a ‘phenotypal’ transition from normal to cancerous cell traits, including an increased rate of cell proliferation and a decrease in programmed cell death – hallmark features of precancerous and/or cancerous cells associated with ‘immortalization.’

Owing to the fact that the researchers tested human gastric epithelial cells, a type of stomach cell in direct contact with material we eat, and considering the broad range of drug, personal care and food products nanoparticle TiO2 is commonly used within, the toxicological implications of these findings are deeply concerning.

We Are Already Eating Titanium Dioxide

TiO2 is a naturally occurring oxide of titanium, and has a wide range of industrial applications as a “whitening” pigment in plastics, ceramic glazes and paints. It is used in sunscreens as a UV absorbing “sun protection factor,” due to its high refractive index. Most of our risk of exposure comes from its use in toothpaste, drugs and excipient-heavy supplements as a pill coating, and food products, including even milk (to ‘improve’ appearance and texture).

Indeed, given that TiO2 is found in thousands of consumer products, the odds are that you are already being exposed to a significant quantity of them on a daily basis. As reported byEverydayhealth.com, “You ingest around 100 trillion nanoparticles every day, researchers at Binghamton University and Cornell University say.”

So, what are some common brands who use it? Nanotitanium is found in products produced by Jello, Nestlé, M&M’s, Mother’s, Mentos, Albertson’s, Hostess and Kool Aid.

Below is a table from the 2012 E Magazine article “Eating Nano” revealing its presence in common U.S. packaged goods.

Nanoparticles and Common Food Brands

Is Titanium Dioxide Regulated?

Much like present day radiobiological risk assessments for technologies like mammography were developed long before the discovery of DNA, making it impossible to comprehend their DNA-damaging properties at that time, present day biosafety regulations of TiO2 were determined long before the advent of nanotechnology. In both cases, the true harms of these technologies were — and still are — greatly underestimated.

As a result of this information gap, TiOis currently classified as ‘generally recognized as safe’ (GRAS) by the FDA, regardless of format. Remarkably, the FDA still allows titanium dioxide in sunscreens “at concentrations of up to 25 percent alone and 2 to 25 percent in combination with any proposed Category I sunscreen active ingredient” without considering the toxicity differential of particle size.[3] Considering that concentrations as low as 0.001% by weight have been found to exhibit clear cytotoxicity within exposed cells,[4] the biosafety regulations governing TiO2 are as great as 5 orders of magnitude or higher less stringent than they should be to protect the consumer.

Nanoparticles are so small they are below the threshold of visibility. This is one reason why they are used for sun protection factor, as 100 nanometers or smaller particles will not leave the white pasty appearance on the skin associated with larger particles. What you can’t see, however, is still there – and in the case of nanotitanium, may slip through the surface layers of our skin into more sensitive tissues, as well as our blood stream. This is also why, if you use sunscreen, you should make sure the ingredients say “non-nanoparticle” when describing titanium dioxide or zinc oxide. And this rule applies to purportedly ‘natural’ brands as well.

Technically, a nanoparticle, also known as a ‘ultrafine particle,’ is a particle that is sized within the nanometer scale: literally, anywhere between 1-100 billionth (nano) of a meter in diameter. Going up in scale, larger particles are known as ‘fine particles,’ sized between 2,500 and 100 nanometers, and so-called ‘coarse particles’ are sized between 10,000 and 2,500 nanometers.

How ‘Smaller’ Can Indicate A Much Larger Problem

Nanotechnology inverts the unsophisticated logic of conventional toxicology risk assessments: namely, that the smaller the amount of something (concentration or size), the less harmful it is. We have seen how this logic has failed with petrochemical-derived chemicals like benzene, considered toxic in the parts-per-trillion range, and endocrine disrupters like bisphenol A and parabens, which exert powerful hormone-mimicking properties that sometimes increase as their concentration decrease. More recently, Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide (glyphosate), was found to exhibit estrogenicity (and concomitant carcinogenicity) in the parts-per-trillion concentration range. There is also the case of so-called ‘low dose’ radioisotopes such as depleted uranium, whose relatively low radiolytic decay relative to gamma-ray emitting plutonium generates the illusion that it is safer (recent research performed by the U.S. Army’s own Radiobiological Research Institute indicates these “lower risk” radiation sources cause up to a million-fold more damage than present risk models explain due to a phenomenon known as the photoelectic effect).

In other words, less is not only more, but when it comes to particle size, smaller sizes often convey exponentially higher toxicity than larger ones.

Why Are We Not Being Protected?

So, why isn’t more being done to protect the consumer from the clear and present health threat represented by nanotechnology? Considering that the Food and Drug Administration does exactly that: administers and/or executes the interests of the food and drug manufacturers, we are supplicating to the wrong entity. The FDA is at least consistent by deciding to allow the food industry to govern itself, but what about the food industry’s liability in saturating our food supply with trillions of nanoparticles per serving, without warning the consumer?

According to Tom Philpot, writing for Grist in 2010“As with GMOs, the strategy seems to be: release into the food supply en masse first; assess risks later (if ever).”

This strategy, while a seemingly successful short-term business model for nanotechnology stakeholders, is utter insanity when one considers the long-term fall out it will have on the industry once millions wake up to the fact they have been treated, once gain, like guinea pigs.

Moreover, as a growing body of peer-reviewed research on the dangers of nanoparticles accumulates, the millions who have already been exposed unknowingly to their ill effects have a legal right to sue for damages. The food industry’s increasingly nefarious stance towards the very consumers who ensure their continued business defies logic, and indicates just how unethical their business model really is.

There is really only one answer to this problem. As with unlabeled GMOs, the consumer must refuse to consume them, forcing the manufacturers to bow to the holy dollar and reformulate; or, better yet, the ‘consumer’ must learn how to redefine itself entirely by becoming, once again, a producer, one garden (urban, suburban or rural) at a time. By growing and eating whole foods directly from the earth, we eliminate a wide range of health hazards the mass market food industry has built into their disease-promoting business model.

Article Resources

[1] Monica Catarina Botelho, Carla Costa, Susana Silva, Solange Costa, Alok Dhawan, Paula A Oliveira, João P Teixeira. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gastric epithelial cells in vitro. Biomed Pharmacother. 2013 Aug 23. Epub 2013 Aug 23. PMID: 24051123

[2] GreenMedInfo.com, Research > Problem Substances > Index: T’s > Titanium Dioxide

[3] FDA. Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Amendment to the Tentative Final Monograph; Enforcement Policy. Federal Register. 1998;63:56584–56589.

[4] Julia X Yu, Thomas H Li. Distinct biological effects of different nanoparticles commonly used in cosmetics and medicine coatings Cell Biosci. 2011; 1: 19. Published online 2011 May 19. doi: 10.1186/2045-3701-1-19

Further articles by Sayer Ji

About the author:
Sayer-JiSayer Ji is the founder and director of www.GreenMedInfo.com and an advisory board member at the National Health Federation, an international nonprofit, consumer-education, health-freedom organization.

He co-authored the book Cancer Killers: The Cause Is The Cure, and is currently co-authoring another book with Tania Melkonian entitled EATomology: An Edible Philosophy of Food.

Raw Gluten Free Vegan Millet & Seed crackers

2 Nov

seed-cracker-jar

These crackers are part of my search for easy grab & go snacks for our arsenal. Kicking processed, supermarket food has brought it’s challenges, the biggest being “on the go” quick & easily transportable snacks. Miss Two & I are constantly on the go, so I need snacks daily & while Miss Two is happy with a banana or apple day after day, Mama is not! I wish I shared her love for fruit, but I prefer a variety of food & can’t bear to eat the same thing over & over.

The great thing about these crackers (other than they are super easy to make) is that you can create hundreds of variations using this base recipe & adding herbs, spices & flavourings your family like. We have made curry versions, non vegan parmesan cheese & basil & spicy chilli flavoured crackers – but the variations are endless.

And the best part………….kept in an airtight Mason jar these bad boys will last for ages – so you don’t have to be constantly cooking, YAY!

I love making everything from scratch for my family & knowing exactly what is in our food & more importantly what isn’t!! But I do get tired of constantly cooking – I am lazy & not really a natural cook so I am always looking for the cheats way out & this recipe is making it into my arsenal – so give it a try.

Raw Gluten Free Millet & Seed Crackers a’la Mama Going Natural

  • 1/2 c millet
  • 1/2 c sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 c linseeds (flax seeds)
  • 3 t chia seeds
  • 1/2  t Tamari (low salt fermented soy sauce)
  • 1/2 t himalayan salt
  • 1 t smoked paprika
  • 1/3 c filtered water

Place your millet & sunflower seeds in a blender or thermomix & blitz till they make a flour. Add the rest of the ingredients & stir in gently on low speed.

I make my crackers in a dehydrator but you could always slow bake them in a warm oven till they dry out, just make sure you line your trays with baking paper.

Smooth out your mixture on the dehydrator mats or on baking paper till its the thickness you prefer, I make our crackers thin as that’s how we like them. You can make them free form like the ones pictured or spread them out over your tray & after your crackers have dehydrated for 2 hours take them out & score the tray into the cracker size you want. Once they are fully dehydrated they can be snapped along your score lines.

These crackers take about 4 to 6 hours to dehydrate on high in my dehydrator but you will need to test the time they take in yours. Taste test as they are dehydrating – you can take them out early & have a chewy cracker or leave them to dry for longer to make a firm wafer style cracker.

seed-crackers

Enjoy & get cracker making!

Mama-going-natural-signature

%d bloggers like this: